The Effects of Parent-Child Interactive Music Therapy on Sentence Verbalisation in a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Case Study

  • Charoenphol Chanyanit College of Music, Mahidol University, Phutthamonthon Nakhonpathom, 73170 Thailand
  • Natee Chiengchana Ratchasuda College, Mahidol University, Phutthamonthon Nakhonpathom, 73170 Thailand
  • Nion Tayrattanachai College of Music, Mahidol University, Phutthamonthon Nakhonpathom, 73170 Thailand
Keywords: Autism spectrum disorder, interactive music therapy, parent-child interaction, sentence verbalisation

Abstract

This study examined the effects of parent-child interactive music therapy on sentence verbalisation in a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and was conducted via a case study design. The participants were a boy with autism spectrum disorder and his mother. The child and his mother attended interactive music therapy sessions that provided singing, instrument playing, songwriting, and movement. Twelve sessions were conducted during this study consisting of two initial assessments and 10 intervention sessions. The initial assessments determined the child’s behaviour while in an environment with music and his preferred music. The intervention sessions consisted of two parts to enhance the child’s sentence verbalisation. The first part aimed to teach and assess words through pre-composed songs. The second part aimed to motivate the child’s sentence verbalisation using one selected song and measured the verbalisation score using a verbalisation rating scale. The results showed the effectiveness of parent-child interaction on the child’s ability to focus on verbalisation through a combination of singing and movement activities. The child’s verbalisation was clearer and more accurate after attending singing activities with his mother as she held the child in her arms and together engaged in physical interaction. His average verbalisation score increased from 1.33 to 3, presenting an improvement of his verbalisation from verbalising single words to verbalising three-word sentences that included a subject, verb, and object.

Author Biographies

Charoenphol Chanyanit, College of Music, Mahidol University, Phutthamonthon Nakhonpathom, 73170 Thailand

Chanyanit Charoenphol is a candidate for the Master of Music degree in music therapy at the College of Music at Mahidol University, Thailand. She has a Bachelor of Music degree in classical music performance from the College of Music, Mahidol University, Thailand. She is currently a classical guitar teacher at the Thailand Guitar Society of Bangkok in Thailand.

Natee Chiengchana, Ratchasuda College, Mahidol University, Phutthamonthon Nakhonpathom, 73170 Thailand

Natee Chiengchana is an assistant professor in Music Education at Ratchasuda College at Mahidol University in Thailand. He has extensive experience as a music educator and music therapist in the area of exceptional children. His research interests focus on inclusive music education and music therapy, music for children with autism, children with behaviour or emotional disorders, and children with hearing loss.

Nion Tayrattanachai, College of Music, Mahidol University, Phutthamonthon Nakhonpathom, 73170 Thailand

Ni-on Tayrattanachai is a lecturer, researcher and advisor in music education at the College of Music, Mahidol University. She is also a reviewer for several music journals, and the Chair of Thailand International Music Examination (TIME). She received her doctoral degree and masters degree in music education from the College of Music, Mahidol University and a bachelor’s degree in piano performance under the guidance of Janida Tangdajahiran.

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Published
2019-11-22
How to Cite
Chanyanit, C., Chiengchana, N., & Tayrattanachai, N. (2019). The Effects of Parent-Child Interactive Music Therapy on Sentence Verbalisation in a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Case Study. Malaysian Journal of Music, 8, 86-95. Retrieved from http://ojs.upsi.edu.my/index.php/MJM/article/view/1878